We take a look at the key looks from four major designers - Dries, Rochas, Margiela and Vaccarello

Anthony Vaccarello's super-sexy aesthetic was funnelled into thigh-baring splits, tough embellished leather pieces and sheer fabrics with a hint of sharply cut suiting thrown in for good measure. But his take on denim was the real star attraction - slouchy or high-waisted skinny jeans were cropped, with some even festooned with large gold buttons for a modern-cool version of the wardrobe staple. While the collection's closing looks were flesh flashing and deconstructed-military raunchy, gold hardware ensured the overall effect was slick and luxe.

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With coloured beehives and gravity defying up 'dos firmly in place, John Galliano presented a pastel-coloured vision of warped sci-fi meets '50s housewife for Maison Margiela. While androgynous male models dressed in skirts and suits made headlines, Galliano's Japanese-derived influences could be seen in the fluid skirts and bow and sash detailing. Fabrics were rich and intricate - from heavy beaded embellishment to laser-cut details on skirts and dresses giving an almost 3D effect.

It's always a joy to behold the prints and unlikely colour combinations at Dries van Noten and this season's collection lived up to expectations. With generously cut suiting, midi dresses and ankle-length skirts leading the charge, there was an element of vintage Hollywood glamour that permeated the collection. Vibrant jewel tones dominated and were layered to dazzling and occasionally eccentric effect. And while it wouldn't be a Dries show without stunning prints and patterns, the long-sleeved shirts worn under bralets and button-ups imbued the collection with a sense of textural old-world opulence.

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Alessandro Dell'Acqua's vision for Rochas was by no means minimalist in scope, but amongst the larger voluminous statements there were quieter moments of beauty that few romantics could find fault with. Opening the show with a series of metallic floral-printed silk pieces, the silhouette was clean but generously proportioned. While dreamy pastel and white concoctions of lace, silk and sheer organza followed - with soft ruffles, large bows and billowing skirts a pretty touch - the collection closed with a more-directional take on ballgowns and luxurious use of gold and black embellished brocade. Peppered throughout were modern body-skimming slip dresses cut in various fabrics - the perfect mix of feminine froth and  '90s minimalism. 

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