Kicking off day two of MFW, Max Mara brought the safari suit to S/S '17.

MFW recap: designers go full throttle on day 2

Rendered in sunny palm tree and tropical prints, bombers, skirt sets, visors and leggings were a friendly addition to a resort-ish collection. Referencing the athleisure movement (it's clear by now this is more than a passing trend) with sexy one-piece bodysuits with corsetry detailing and a casual approach to tailoring, the show blended sportswear fabrics with ready-to-wear construction. Side note: did the the leather clogs/heels remind anyone else of Christopher Kane's Crocs? Is this the next phase of the ugly shoe trend?

MFW recap: designers go full throttle on day 2

Karl Lagerfeld and Silvia Venturini Fendi's vision for Fendi was slightly more romantic, envisioning soft stripes and boudoir-esque silk dresses and scalloped-hem blouses for S/S '17. Thanks to sheer florals, sensual flashes of skin and fluid silhouettes the collection was like a spring fever dream - soft, whimsical and unashamedly feminine. Anchored by a collection of ornate, confectionary coloured handbags and bag charms that are sure to become collector's items - it was hard to imagine a more spring-ready collection than this.

MFW recap: designers go full throttle on day 2

For Massimo Giorgetti at Emilio Pucci, it took a while (12 looks, in fact) to warm up to showing the kind of prints the label is known for. Opening the show with a series of bold, block-coloured dresses, Giorgetti eventually moved into loose swirling prints, brought to life in lemon, tangerine, chocolate or stark black and white. Eventually, the bold and psychedelic '60s prints appeared, modernised in shades of yellow, lime green, candy pink and fiery red and by body-skimming cuts and mini dresses with exaggerated sleeves.

MFW recap: designers go full throttle on day 2

At Prada, ready-to-wear was stripped back to the classics, but adorned with quirky details like ostrich feathers on sleeves, the bust and on heels and sandals. Clothes were cut close to the body, but styled in typically Prada ways - with clashing geometric prints and cropped camisoles and dresses worn over buttoned-up shirts. With a focus on print, crystal embellishment and those fluttering ostrich plumes, Miuccia presented a collection of separates which, when pulled apart, could easily find a place in every woman's closet.

MFW recap: designers go full throttle on day 2

Lastly, at Moschino, Jeremy Scott's mastery of pop culture iconography took a non-digital turn, as he brought paper dolls to life on the runway. Using trompe l'oeil to feature cut-out bodies of women and painted-on clothes complete with pearl necklaces and Moschino belts, he took the idea of paper dolls so literally there were even paper tabs attached to some looks.

While both visually striking and disarming to see real women turned into 2-D figures, it's no small coincidence he cast Insta-girls and Victoria's Secret models like Gigi Hadid, Bella Hadid, Stella Maxwell, Taylor Hill and Sara Sampaio in his show. Like paper dolls themselves, these are girls who are usually viewed via mobile and computer screens - willingly turning their lives into 2-D caricatures for our own social media consumption. That might be reading too deeply, but it's an interesting notion.     

MFW recap: designers go full throttle on day 2