England's capital harbours some impressive design talent, not to mention a commitment to colour and quirky patterns

If NYFW was all about streetwear and new forms of tailoring, London's specialty is a chaotic, brilliant mess of vibrant hues and crazy prints. As always, the English approach to fashion is the opposite of safe and predictable, with many designers taking an anything-goes approach. J.W. Anderson kicked things off with his usual inventive take on asymmetry, followed by Simone Rocha's ethereal and layered approach to floral dresses and trench coats. Emilia Wickstead went all-out pretty with a series of pastel toned and sweetly patterned dresses fit for a princess. Gareth Pugh, by contrast, presented a maxed-out show filled with OTT headdresses that gave the clothes a vaguely religious undertone to them.

Mary Katrantzou proved why she's the queen of prints with a collection of zany, entirely original dresses and pants suits that could easily double as an optical illusion, while Topshop Unique looked to the '80s for some of its more outré looks. At Peter Pilotto, candy coloured and metallic fabrics took centre stage alongside voluminous skirts and an almost childlike use of lace applique, but the real showstopper was Charlotte Olympia. Taking us to the '40s with a cabaret show that was literally bananas (and dancing girls), plus fruit salad-wearing models - a gloriously batty presentation that succinctly sums up the British approach fashion. We love.

London Fashion Week: designers turn up the volume for S/S ’17