In recent years he's hosted shows at a Chanel-branded supermarket, the brasserie and even staged a pro-women's lib rally - but for A/W '16 couture, the king of reinvention struck again - this time, with a casino featuring 20 of his favourite celebs. Last night, the Grand Palais was transformed into La Cercle Privé - an array of Blackjack and roulette tables surrounded by poker machines. 

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All bets are on: Chanel couture’s gamble pays off 

As guests sat and watched the action unfurl - Kristen Stewart walking into an empty casino, followed closely by Karl's other Chanel-clad favourites Lara Stone, Rita Ora, Geraldine Chaplin, Rinko Kikuchi, Vanessa Paradis, Lily Rose Depp, Stella Tennant, Lily Collins and Julianne Moore. As the A-listers sat and took the roulette and Blackjack tables for a spin, the models slowly circled.

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While the first half of the collection was dominated by skirt suits, what marked these as different from normal was the technique used to produce them. Using "selective laser sintering" the suits and evening dresses came embroidered, painted or braided using the computer-generated lasers. "The idea was to take the most iconic jacket from the 20th century and turn it into a 21st century version which was technically not possible at the time it was born", explains Lagerfeld. While the gambling metaphor could certainly be applied to the economic state of the industry today, or even the sheer nerve of staging a fashion show in today's Insta-worthy climate, it also kind of sums up the leap into technology from a house steeped in meticulous couture tradition.

But enough about the show, what about the looks? Cut in Chanel's iconic tweed, the palette of cream, navy, grey, red, black skirt suits were paired with black geometric-shaped booties that complemented the futuristic bobs worn by each model. And while the second half of the collection was dominated by asymmetrical-hemmed evening dresses (many trimmed with feathers or beads), tiered gowns with lace accents and full 3D skirts - it was the final look which brought something Karl's vision to the table. Modelled by Kendall Jenner, the white satin bridal tuxedo blended the masculine appeal of a well-cut suit with the frou frou-nature of a wedding veil. It's a look that only the daring would attempt - but as a gamble, we reckon it would pay off.     

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