The unhealthy 'heroin chic' look that ruled the runways, ad campaigns and glossy magazines in the 90s left a profoundly unfortunate legacy for more recent generations of models - the super skinny underweight look that has became the norm in the modelling industry. Except, it's not 'the norm'  - it's an incredibly unhealthy, unsustainable ideal detrimental to the health of the model and any young models-in-the-making, desperate to be just like their fave catwalk star. And the rise of social media certainly hasn't helped, Instagram is lousy with images of frighteningly thin #skinny bodies.  So thank goodness for the French.

In 2015 the birthplace of haute couture passed a law banning excessively thin fashion models and that law has finally come into effect. From now on fashion models wanting to work in France will be required to present a doctor's certificate to prove they are healthy (the doctor will take into consideration their Body Mass Index (BMI) amongst other factors like age and body shape) and agencies that let their models work without proper health certificates face large fines of up to $82,000 and could be spending up to six months in the joint.

From October 1, French magazines will also face a new set of responsibilities under the new laws - any digitally retouched images of models must be labelled as a "retouched photograph", according to the BBC.

Other countries that have sensibly got the healthy body image memo include Spain and Italy - who passed similar laws on underweight models in 2006. Israel passed a law in 2012 banning super skinny models without health certificates and the US may follow suit, with California tabling a bill last year to address the super skinny 'anorexic chic' epidemic in the US modelling industry.

The skinny on France’s new modelling industry laws