Earlier this year France joined Spain, Italy and Israel in the fight against unhealthy body image in the modelling industry, with a law banning excessively thin fashion models from working in France coming into effect.  Fines are now issued for any company in France allowing unhealthily thin models to strut the catwalk or work on a fashion shoot without presenting a doctor's certificate to prove they are a healthy. 

And now two of France's biggest luxury fashion players, LVMH and Kering (owner of Gucci, YSL, Stella McCartney and many other luxe labels) have, according to WWD, joined forces to weigh in on this very serious health issue. The two powerhouse companies are developing a 'model charter' which will, "...ensure the well-being of models following a string of high-profile incidents during Paris Fashion Week in February."

The model charter will apply immediately to all brands owned by both groups globally and similar to the laws France brought in this May WWD reports the charter, "...requires models to present a recent medical certificate proving their overall health, and bans the hiring of models below the age of 16 in shows or shoots representing an adult."

According to WWD, chairman and CEO of Kering, François-Henri Pinault has been working on finding a resolution to this unhealthy model body image for the past couple of years but fast tracked the initiative after, "...casting director James Scully blew the whistle on several brands, including Balenciaga, Hermès and Elie Saab, for allegedly abusing models."

Pinault told WWD, "That's where I decided in March, 'Enough is enough. We are going to put in place some rules and I want those rules to be implemented for the next fashion week."

The charter bans French size 32 for women (US size zero) and size 42 for men from LVMH and Kering brands casting calls and require models' medical certificates to be less than six months old (the French law requires them to be no more than two years old).  Pinault told WWD, "A lot of people know... people affected by the scourge of anorexia. This represents an important advance in tackling the issue of excessive thinness and in particular anorexia in our profession."

LVMH and Kering take a weighty stand on size zero models