Is the rag trade finally getting the healthy body memo? Sending hungry-looking, rail-thin models down the catwalk has been the fashion industry standard for decades, with leading designers like Karl Lagerfeld quoted as saying people prefer to look at 'skinny models'.  When a 'plus size' model like the gorgeous, healthy size 12, Australian model Robyn Lawley lands a cover it makes headlines for all the wrong reasons.

But it seems modelling 'anorexia chic' on the catwalk isn't selling clothes but rather a shockingly unhealthy, potentially life-threatening lifestye of not eating, bulimia and taking up smoking to suppress appetite. Which is not only detrimental to models' health but also the kids who seek to be just like their favourite catwalk stars.

Passing its first legislative hurdle last Wednesday, Assemblyman Marc Levine said his new California bill aims to "...not only to protect the health of the workers themselves, but also to help young people who emulate models." The bill would require the state to develop health standards for models and regard them as employees of the brands they represent. The bill still has a number of hoops to get through before it becomes law, but it seems like a sensible step in the right direction towards healthy body image within and outside the aesthetic driven fashion industry.

Is the US banning skinny models?