It’s blogger versus editor in a war between old-school and new media, thanks to a scorching story published on Vogue.com on Sunday evening

We wonder if US Vogue's digital editors knew which pot they were stirring when they published some controversial opinions about the role bloggers play at fashion week? In a Milan Fashion Week recap published on Vogue.com this weekend, four fashion editors and critics made some inflammatory comments about the state of the industry - and industry which invariably now includes social influencers, alongside models, designers, creatives, journalists and the rest.  Naturally, their ire drew the attention of said bloggers, sparking a war of words which played out in the most public way possible on - you guessed it - Instagram and Twitter.

Here, we sum up the argument, starting with the offending Vogue.com post:

"A collection was either all about the ateliers and craftsmen (for example, Bottega Veneta's 50th anniversary show with its empowering, lovely pieces) or the creation of streetwear stars and clothes made to stop traffic and paparazzi. It's a schizophrenic moment, and that just can't be good. (Note to bloggers who change head-to-toe, paid-to-wear outfits every hour: Please stop. Find another business. You are heralding the death of style.)" -  Vogue creative digital director Sally Singer.

"So yes, Sally, the professional blogger bit, with the added aggression of the street photographer swarm who attend them, is horrible, but most of all, pathetic for these girls, when you watch how many times the desperate troll up and down outside shows, in traffic, risking accidents even, in hopes of being snapped. The non-photographed interested me far more..." - Vogue.com chief critic Sarah Mower

"Which brings me back around to Sally and Sarah's points about the street style mess. It's not just sad for the women who preen for the cameras in borrowed clothes, it's distressing, as well, to watch so many brands participate." - Vogue Runway director Nicole Phelps

It’s on: bloggers face off in a war with Vogue editors

"Am I allowed to admit that I did a little fist pump when Sally broached the blogger paradox? There's not much I can add here beyond how funny it is that we even still call them "bloggers," as so few of them even do that anymore. Rather than a celebration of any actual style, it seems to be all about turning up, looking ridiculous, posing, twitching in your seat as you check your social media feeds, fleeing, changing, repeating . . . It's all pretty embarrassing-even more so when you consider what else is going on in the world. (Have you registered to vote yet? Don't forget the debate on Monday!)

Loving fashion is tremendous, and enthusiasts of all stripes are important to the industry-after all, people buy clothing because of desire, not any real need-but I have to think that soon people will wise up to how particularly gross the whole practice of paid appearances and borrowed outfits looks. Looking for style among a bought-and-paid-for ("blogged out?") front row is like going to a strip club looking for romance. Sure, it's all kind of in the same ballpark, but it's not even close to the real thing." - Vogue.com fashion news editor Alessandra Codinha

Yeah - they went there. And now, the rebuttals, which started with the 'original' bloggers, like Susie Lau aka Susie Bubble on Twitter:

And then it was Bryan Boy’s turn, who called it “schoolyard bullying”:

And Jane Aldridge of Sea of Shoes (remember her?):

Stylist, social influencer and street-style favourite Shea Marie soon jumped in:

Please read!! Dear a certain few Vogue.com editors- The only thing that is "pathetic" here is this jealous, catty and hypocritical article you've just published. You are exactly the type of people that have given the fashion world the cold, unwelcoming and ruthless reputation it has had in the past. Thankfully those times are changing. I'm sorry if you can't accept that what a "public figure" wears on the street is undoubtedly more influential than your post-fashion week column. That the fashion world isn't controlled by you alone anymore. You even criticize the brands, for what? For having figured out the obvious: (news flash!) what people choose to wear and purchase is greatly inspired by the people they admire- the public figures (influencers, actors/actresses, musicians, bloggers, models). I respect you all deeply and the hard work you put into the industry. I look up to you. Which is why I feel so taken aback now at how tasteless and classless the words are that you chose. I would think an institution such as Vogue would respect young entrepreneurs instead of belittling them. It's ironic how you make degrading comments about influencers, and then put them on your international covers to boost sales. And to echo the statements of others- how many of your covers are paid for "head to toe looks" by brands? What about the daily "street style" pictures and articles on your website homepage. Why? Because-guess what?-that's what gets the clicks. As for your "get a real career" comment- I'm not sure exactly who you're referring to; surely not me or someone like me. I built and design my own successful line, I style and creative consult for countless brands, and am invested in numerous other successful businesses behind the scenes. I grew up in a small town and came from nothing- I'd call that pretty impressive and admirable. I take pride in giving hope to young women around the world that they too can build something from nothing. I think I speak for "us" all when I say the bottom line here is that if you weren't threatened you wouldn't care at all. ✌

 

Shea's Instagram caption: 

"Please read!! Dear a certain few Vogue.com editors-

The only thing that is "pathetic" here is this jealous, catty and hypocritical article you've just published. You are exactly the type of people that have given the fashion world the cold, unwelcoming and ruthless reputation it has had in the past. Thankfully those times are changing. I'm sorry if you can't accept that what a "public figure" wears on the street is undoubtedly more influential than your post-fashion week column. That the fashion world isn't controlled by you alone anymore. You even criticize the brands, for what? For having figured out the obvious: (news flash!) what people choose to wear and purchase is greatly inspired by the people they admire- the public figures (influencers, actors/actresses, musicians, bloggers, models).

I respect you all deeply and the hard work you put into the industry. I look up to you. Which is why I feel so taken aback now at how tasteless and classless the words are that you chose. I would think an institution such as Vogue would respect young entrepreneurs instead of belittling them. It's ironic how you make degrading comments about influencers, and then put them on your international covers to boost sales. And to echo the statements of others- how many of your covers are paid for "head to toe looks" by brands? What about the daily "street style" pictures and articles on your website homepage. Why? Because-guess what?-that's what gets the clicks.

As for your "get a real career" comment- I'm not sure exactly who you're referring to; surely not me or someone like me. I built and design my own successful line, I style and creative consult for countless brands, and am invested in numerous other successful businesses behind the scenes. I grew up in a small town and came from nothing- I'd call that pretty impressive and admirable. I take pride in giving hope to young women around the world that they too can build something from nothing. I think I speak for "us" all when I say the bottom line here is that if you weren't threatened you wouldn't care at all."

The issue also got Shea Marie’s bestie Caroline Vreeland involved, who name-dropped her famous great-grandmother Diana Vreeland (the former editor in chief of US Vogue) for effect.

[Mini Preface here: I was waiting to post this pic as my very own warm spirited "Ciao, Milano!" But now it seems even more apropos... ] Dear @voguemagazine, since you hold a special and significant place in my heart, may I pose a question? If certain people on your team hate bloggers & influencers so much, I'm just curious why you put them on your international covers to increase sales. I'm not a blogger but I find your recent statements old fashioned and just plain rude. Most of the bloggers I know are hard working young entrepreneurs. I find it shameful that an institution such as Vogue would demean and belittle these young people who are building their own paths, especially since they are mostly young women, calling them "pathetic" and comparing them to strippers. This certainly isn't the Vogue voice my great-grandmother once stood for. One contributor writes that she envies the Italian woman who enjoys life...maybe less complaining and worrying about what other people are doing would help to quell this jealousy. I say live and let live! I think all chic women, Italian and otherwise, would agree. Xoxo, the girl who wore a full body fishnet at 9am. Photo by @timuremek_photography

A photo posted by Caroline Vreeland (@carolinevreeland) on

Caroline's Instagram caption: 

"[Mini Preface here: I was waiting to post this pic as my very own warm spirited "Ciao, Milano!" But now it seems even more apropos... ]

Dear @voguemagazine, since you hold a special and significant place in my heart, may I pose a question? If certain people on your team hate bloggers & influencers so much, I'm just curious why you put them on your international covers to increase sales. I'm not a blogger but I find your recent statements old fashioned and just plain rude. Most of the bloggers I know are hard working young entrepreneurs. I find it shameful that an institution such as Vogue would demean and belittle these young people who are building their own paths, especially since they are mostly young women, calling them "pathetic" and comparing them to strippers. This certainly isn't the Vogue voice my great-grandmother once stood for. One contributor writes that she envies the Italian woman who enjoys life...maybe less complaining and worrying about what other people are doing would help to quell this jealousy. I say live and let live! I think all chic women, Italian and otherwise, would agree. Xoxo, the girl who wore a full body fishnet at 9am."

It’s on: bloggers face off in a war with Vogue editors

As it happens, we can understand both sides' points clearly. It's a debate as old as the one about social media and its destructive effect on society. While we don't think influencers are going anywhere soon, neither is Vogue. So for now, we guess this is at a stalemate.

It’s on: bloggers face off in a war with Vogue editors