In a galaxy far far away... future generations of earthlings might be able to live, if NASA's Kepler telescope has captured the data correctly. Which it probably has since it was designed by rocket scientists. The great unknown beyond our own galaxy has fascinated not just Captain James T. Kirk and his Star Trek crew but pretty much anyone with two feet and a heartbeat. Whether we're alone in the universe and if there are any other planets we could live on are questions we've been seeking answers to for decades. There's also the long game environmental issue of us running out of resources - we need a planet plan B.

So NASA's latest planet discovery news is epic. In a news conference in Silicon Valley on Monday, NASA reported the Kepler telescope had found, "...219 new planet candidates, 10 of which are near-Earth size and orbiting their star's habitable zone, which is the range of distance from a star where liquid water could pool on the surface of a rocky planet." Translation? Those 10 planets have the most basic requirements to potentially support life.

According to NASA, their Kepler telescope is the "first agency mission capable of detecting Earth-sized planets using the transit method." All the planets detected by Kepler are far outside our solar system, the 10 which Kepler detected as Earth-size are from an area in the galaxy called the Goldilocks zone.

"Are we alone? Maybe Kepler today has told us indirectly, although we need confirmation, that we are probably not alone," Kepler scientist Mario Perez said at Monday's news conference and reported in The New York Times

Bored of living on Earth? NASA has MAJOR news for you