When you hit 18 in many countries you get the keys to the kingdom, specifically you're legal to do all the stuff that grown ups take for granted like drink and decide who's going to run the country. Which is all pretty great, but you're also no longer legally the responsibility of your parents, which means it's time to get  job and earn your own money. But what happens when a potential employer - and this is becoming very common practice - checks in on your social media profile. Yup, gulp.

That post where you were underage drinking at the prom and things got super messy? Not the image any employer is hoping will crop up when a client Googles their team. That ranty bullying thread you got sucked into when pressure to join in trumped good choices? Career death-knell. How about that time you posted nude images on a summer vacay? HR is going to file that application in the no pile. So much social visibility when you're too young to think through the consequences is kind of terrifying, which is where British Prime Minister Theresa May comes in.

According to Dazeddigital.com Theresa May recently announced potential new legislation for the UK that will give Facebook users the legal right to wipe clean anything from their social media history including photos, messages and other information that they posted before they turned 18.  Per the article it comes hard on the heels of a 19-year-old Labour activist who was forced to resign from her role in a local student political organisation because of racist tweets she allegedly made when she was in her mid-teens. This magic social media erasing tool sounds like the perfect 18th birthday gift for the millenial who has everything.

Attention teens, want a clean social media slate? Here’s how