The announcement of the nominees for the 90th Academy Awards yesterday means the Oscars are back in the spotlight but not for the usual reasons like who will head home with a gold statue in hand. Instead top of mind is what happened at the end of the 2017 Oscars ceremony.

If you were running a media blackout last February, here's what you missed: in a total catastrophe for the awards ceremony but complete boon for entertainment value, Brian Cullinan, a partner from accounting firm PwC, which runs the ballots and hands out the winning envelopes, reportedly got distracted by all the star power backstage and allegedly took a snap of Emma Stone which he tweeted from his personal Twitter account. In his distracted state Cullinan handed the best actress envelope (with Emma Stone's name on it) over to Warren Beatty and Faye Dunaway, the presenters of the best picture category.

Beatty and Dunaway announced La La Land as the best picture winner and the cast and filmmakers from that film assembled joyfully on the stage to accept the Oscar for... Moonlight. The mix up was swiftly corrected, the right movie name read out and the Moonlight team came up to accept the gong. But the gaffe has made it into entertainment history as one of the biggest awards ceremony #fails of all time.

Oscars 2017 envelope #fail. Image: Getty

PwC took full responsibility and banned Brian Cullinan (and the other partner responsible for envelope handing out, Martha Ruiz) from the Oscars until the end of time. And according to an exclusive Associated Press article in The Washington Post, the accounting firm have been busy over the last 12 months coming up with a set of six foolproof "protocols" to ensure it never happens again.

While the way the votes are tabulated won't change the six reforms, according to the article will, "...focus on envelope rituals," with the most significant being a ban on PwC partners from using, "...cellphones or social media during the show."  Meaning no more candid backstage celeb snaps from the PwC partners and no more Twitter or 'Gramming either.

Other reforms according to the article include, "...balloting partners will attend show rehearsals and practice what to do if something goes wrong," and other checks and balances to ensure the right envelope is given to the right celeb presenter every time.

The phone ban doesn't apply to the celebs, but many of the best backstage celebrity shots are taken by non-celebs, because just on a practical level, what Hollywood starlet wears a couture gown with pockets big enough to carry a phone?  We'll have to wait until March 4 to see how the new rules play out.

Will the new Oscars ‘rules’ mean no BTS celeb snaps?