Proving it's not just a useless hunk of scrap metal, that cute Star Wars droid is worth some serious bank. Collectors of movie memorabilia and entertainment industry items - such as the original Disneyland map which just sold for US $708,000 - are willing to lay down enormous stacks of cash money to secure their most coveted film props. And in some cases, like the Maltese Falcon statue from the 1941 Humphrey Bogart detective thriller of the same name, there's been almost as much intrigue and interest around the actual prop as there is around the movie itself (the Maltese Falcon statue sold for $4 million USD back in 2013 with much controversy over whether it was real or a fake).

According to The Hollywood Reporter the 110 centimetre tall R2-D2 was sold by auction house Profiles in History and was, "...compiled from parts used throughout filming of the original (Star Wars) trilogy." No intel on who the buyer of the droid was but it was the, "...most expensive item offered in a movie memorabilia auction that included numerous props from the Star Wars franchises. Other items up for sale included Luke Skywalker's lightsaber and Darth Vader's helmet and shoulder armour, as well as Imperial and Rebel weapons."

Star Wars Droid R2-D2

Star Wars is one of the most beloved movie franchises in the history of film making - not only killing it at the box office coming in number three in the top grossing movie franchises of all time behind Harry Potter and Marvel's Cinematic Universe - but also becoming a towering pop culture reference point. Princess Leia's double bun hairstyle launched a thousand copies and everyone at one time in their life has either spoken Yoda-style and/or tried to "use the force" to rope a family member into doing their share of the chores.

In further Star Wars news, Los Angeles City Council has just green-lit legendary Star Wars creator George Lucas' $1.5 billion USD museum, planned for a space next to the University of Southern California - the university where Lucas learnt his craft.

Image rendering courtesy of George Lucas Museum of Narrative Art

According to USA Today the museum will "...feature all forms of narrative storytelling...storyboards, costumes, props and various other elements that went into making Casablanca, The Wizard of Oz... and plenty of cool Star Wars stuff too."

How much would you pay for a ‘Star Wars’ droid?