On Tuesday Variety reported that crude, but also oddly relatable comic Amy Schumer requested she be paid more for her Netflix special upon learning that colleagues Chris Rock and Dave Chappelle were paid a whopping $20 million each for their respective Netflix shows. Schumer was reportedly offered $11 million for Netflix's The Leather Special and received "significantly more compensation" after raising the question of fairness compared to Rock and Chappelle's pay cheques.

The internet, of course, had some big opinions about this, with many praising Schumer's effort to highlight the gender pay-gap, and most condemning the star for comparing herself to two of comedy's greats.

Schumer has been an outspoken advocate for equal pay among genders, speaking for charities such as Equal Rights Now and appearing in a Bud Light commercial on the topic stating: "Bud Light proudly supports equal pay. Bud Light costs the same, no matter whether you're a dude or a lady."

The comedian took to Instagram yesterday to respond to the criticism. Posting a topless photo holding a dog dressed as a hotdog (classic Schumer), she wrote: "Thanks for chiming in on what you feel I deserve to be paid. I believe women deserve equal pay. However I don't believe I deserve equal pay to Chris and Dave. They are legends and 2 of the greatest comics of all time." The post confirms that Schumer did request more than her $11 million offer, but she did not request the same as Rock and Chappelle.

While Schumer proudly supports pay equality, it seems her emphasis on this particular instance misses the point. Pay inequality transcends individual circumstances such as these, effecting women at every level in a number of industries.

Which leads to an interesting question when it comes to equal pay among genders; when does skill outweigh the stereotype?

Did Amy Schumer’s post on equal gender pay miss the mark?