First Hollywood, then the modelling industry and now... tech. It seems the world is only just becoming woke to the insidious nature of toxic masculinity, with cases of sexual abuse and harassment threatening to swallow the internet daily, ever since Harvey Weinsteingate dropped.  While the flow of allegations has been concentrated mainly in the entertainment and media industries, if you've been following the headlines closely, you'll notice it's also been an interesting motivating force in other industries too.

Last week, we reported on the allegations of abuse on models and we're now hearing reports that it's brought the sexist 'tech bro' culture of Silicon Valley to the forefront too. First outlined in a New York Times article by Dan Lyons earlier this year, the notion of a bros culture running rampant isn't exactly breaking news. High profile cases of sexual harassment include Tinder co-founder Whitney Wolfe suing the company she helped found for sexual harassment (and going on the create pro-feminist dating app Bumble in the aftermath). Then there's the case of Susan J. Fowler, a former Uber engineer, who penned a short memoir on her time with the ride sharing app company titled, 'Reflecting On One Very, Very Strange Year At Uber'.

The (disturbing) Uber story coming to a cinema near you

If you've got the time, go read it, because it certainly doesn't portray Uber or any of its executives in a great light. Leaning in, it ain't. Fowler recalls inappropriate sexual  propositions from a boss and a kind-of bullying, we-don't-care attitude from HR. Nice. If you weren't following the case, it's important to note that the events detailed in Fowler's post led to a lawsuit and the eventual demise of Uber's former CEO Travis Kalanick, who stepped down last June amid allegations of sexism and inappropriate behaviour.

Everything considered, we can see why Hidden Figures screenwriter Allison Schroeder is hastily penning a script about the scandal, probably hoping it can secure a director in the same calibre as The Social Network's David Fincher. We'll definitely be watching this Hollywood project unfold. 

The (disturbing) Uber story coming to a cinema near you