File this one in the WTF section: the German distributors of a talking doll have gone into major overdrive to prove that their product My Friend Cayla isn't an espionage device. The innocent looking blonde haired doll (which is also available in Australia) was banned by Germany's Federal Network Agency after it was revealed she had recording capabilities and the ability to access the internet. Researchers claimed that Cayla's unsecured Bluetooth device and internal software could be hacked, giving hackers access to personal data and/or the ability to talk to young children playing with the doll. Creepy much?  

Why are people accusing this talking doll of being a spy?

Going so far to label poor Cayla as an "espionage device", German authorities encouraged parents to destroy the talking doll - or forever live in fear of their child or personal info being hacked. For the record, the doll uses a microphone to record her owner's voice and play it back to them. Marketed as a clever interactive doll, Cayla also accesses the internet via an app that allows users to ask her questions. We'd just also like to point out the irony of the slogan on her box, whcih reads: 'It's amazing what she knows!'

Why are people accusing this talking doll of being a spy?

Obviously, the distributor of the doll is not cool about the spy claim. "She is not an espionage device and can be used safely in every respect according to the user manual," said Vivid GmbH in a statement. They're hoping to challenge the German ban in court - we can bet it's already started to damage sales. Meanwhile, we bet the toy aisle hasn't seen this much drama since Barbie got a real-girl makeover last year...

Why are people accusing this talking doll of being a spy?