We all know music has the ability to lift sagging spirits or, conversely, allow us to wallow in heartbreak or self-pity, but a recent study has proven that your fondness for Adele's weepy ballads, Lana Del Rey's violent fantasies or Bon Iver's sad sack lyrics could actually have a prolonged negative effect on your mental health.

A study recently published in the Frontiers in Human Neuroscience journal measured neural responses to different types of music - from happy to sad or aggressive - and found a link between issues such as anxiety, neuroticism and depression. In fact, participants who listened to sad or agressive music showed increased levels of negative feelings, anxiety and neuroticism - and it was worse in males. 

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"Some ways of coping with negative emotion, such as rumination, which means continually thinking over negative things, are linked to poor mental health. We wanted to learn whether there could be similar negative effects of some styles of music listening," says music therapist Emily Carlson, one of the authors of the study.

So if you're looking to cheer yourself up, perhaps it's best you start swapping out your Nirvana and Nine Inch Nails for a bit more of Katy Perry, Taylor Swift and Daft Punk's most uplifting tracks. Don't say we didn't warn you...

Why listening to Lana might be bad for your mental health

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