Forget Tinder-pocalypse, dating-app fatigue and the rise of the f*ckboi; New research from the University of Sydney suggests that, contrary to popular belief, Tinder and it's digital dating cousins are not, in fact, killing modern romance.

Quite the opposite. From the 366 participants in the study, (mostly below the age of 30) more than half were using the app to find dates as oppose to just hook-ups. "Commencing the study, I actually thought that the data would confirm relationships are less solid in contemporary period," said researcher Dr. Mitchell Hobbs. "Actually, the vast majority [of participants] were saying they value the idea of monogamy and long-term partnerships. 72% of our participants were just as inclined to be monogamous while using the app."

"87% of people told us they had more opportunities to pursue partners as a result of this technology," he continued. "About 66% said that it gave them greater agency and control over romantic and sexual encounters. It's clearly a good thing."

Biological anthropologist Helen Fischer, (also Chief Scientific Advisor to Match.com) agrees. "The only real algorithm is your brain. The main region linked with feelings of intense romantic love is so far deep in the brain, it lies right next to regions that orchestrate thirst and hunger and they are not gonna change if you swipe left or right on Tinder. They evolved millions of years ago."

So keep on swiping, lovers!

Calm down everyone, Tinder isn’t killing modern romance