The Oxford English Dictionary issues an update four times a year showing just how swiftly language changes in our fast paced lives. The words, phrases and "senses" that make the cut in each updated edition offer incredibly interesting insight into not only what's going down in current pop culture but also what the vibe on the global village streets are.  And the latest edition is a knockout update including the following new additions: 'post-truth', 'gin daisy', 'hygge', 'come-to-Jesus', 'webhead', 'woke', 'comeback queen' and randomly, a whole slew of tennis terms like 'tennis bracelet, 'tennis dad', 'tennis mom'.

Adding 'hygge', 'gin daisy', 'webhead', 'comeback queen' and all the tennis words together it sounds like we're all hunkering down at home Danish-style, slinging back gin cocktails, glued to the internet while taking a good, hard look at ourselves and planning how we're going to make our big comeback into career/life/sport (specifically tennis).

As for how 'woke' fits into the grand lexicon scheme the notes for the June 2017 edition on the OED website say, "...the original meaning of adjectival woke was simply 'awake', but by the mid-20th century, 'woke' had been extended figuratively to refer to being 'awake' or 'well informed' in a political or cultural sense. In the past decade, that meaning has been catapulted into mainstream use with particular nuance of 'alert to racial or social discrimination and injustice'...and more recently through its association with the Black Lives Matter movement, especially on social media." Which makes sense given the political climate in the US.

The inclusion of 'post-truth' in the Dictionary in this update follows this political narrative, it was Oxford's 2016 word of the year and they define it as: "Relating to or denoting circumstances in which objective facts are less influential in shaping political debate or public opinion than appeals to emotion and personal belief." So basically according to the Oxford English Dictionary, the world is running on heart.

The Oxford Dictionary just added WHAT to its latest addition?