Duck faces, cute Snapchat filters and peace signs. How many times have you seen these pop up on your Insta-feed? Love 'em or loathe 'em, selfies are now woven so deeply into the fabric of social media, they can hardly be avoided. In fact, so pervasive is selfie culture, that some clever brains at The University of Toronto have undertaken a study on it. And the results? Brutal.

Turns out, people who love taking photos of themselves are more likely to rate themselves as more attractive than they actually are. Go figure. So how did they come up with this? 'Selfie Indulgence: Self-Favoring Biases in Perceptions of Selfies', published in the Social Psychological & Personality Science journal, took 198 college students and asked them to take a selfie and then have their picture taken by someone else. The study group was split into two groups - 100 people who confessed to loving taking photos or themselves and 98 who didn't.

After rating the images themselves, these images were then shown to the public (or an external group), who came up with their own ratings. And according to these findings, the public rated the selfie lovers as more narcissistic and self-favouring. According to the study abstract, "Although selfie-takers and non-selfie-takers reported equal levels of narcissism, we found that the selfie-takers perceived themselves as more attractive and likable in their selfies than in others' photos, but that non-selfie-takers viewed both photos similarly." Interesting.

"Furthermore, external judges rated the targets as less attractive, less likable, and more narcissistic in their selfies than in the photos taken by others." So there you have it guys - you may think your flatteringly angled selfie looks great and it may garner lots of likes; but in actual truth, the outside world is silently laughing and judging you. Somehow, we don't think this applies to the selfie-obsessed Victoria's Secret crew, do you?

Do you take selfies? Then you need to read this