Social media accountability is a hot button topic - everyone has an opinion on what should be shared, what shouldn't and who should take responsibility for policing it (the government? Mark Zuckerberg?) but it's like the Wild West without a town sheriff - it's still a new frontier that's essentially unregulated. And for 10 of the kids set to join the class of 2021 at one of the most prestigious schools in the world, Harvard University, their social media use has cost them their hard-won places.

According to the Harvard University newspaper, The Harvard Crimson,"Harvard College rescinded admissions offers to at least 10 prospective members of the Class of 2021 after the students traded sexually explicit memes and messages that sometimes targeted minority groups in a private Facebook Group chat." Apparently the images and memes included, "...images mocking sexual assault, the Holocaust, and the deaths of children." When Harvard Admissions discovered the contents of posts they immediately revoked offers to members of the group and according to the article, once Harvard revoke an offer, it's final.

While the whole point of social media is to "share" information there's always a moral question of what should be shared. The golden rule of thumb seems to be never share anything you wouldn't want a potential employer to see; or at a baseline level, your parents.

Harvard just broke new ground on social media use