Get used to hash-tagging #nofilter. Worldwide stock photo agency, Getty Images has announced that they are banning all photos of retouched bodies that make the model appear thinner or larger. The change will be enforced for every photographer wanting to contribute imagery to the data base from October 1.

Speaking to Dazed, a representative from Getty explained: "Our perceptions of what is possible are often shaped by what we see: positive imagery can have direct impact on fighting stereotypes, creating tolerance, and empowering communities to feel represented in society."

The use of Photoshop and other retouching services have been a source of contention for the photography world. Even today, photo editing apps allow the everyday person to edit their own images. Society has never been so unrealistic and inauthentic.

Despite living in a (quite literally) filtered world, Getty told Dazed that they have actually seen a spike in searches for images that are 'real': "We've seen a trend towards stepping away from the hyper-airbrushed, perfect images of the past and a growing demand for intersectional realism. The search term 'unfiltered' has gone up +219 per cent over the past year, 'authenticity' has increased 104 per cent and 'real life' up 99 per cent," the representative explained.

Just last week, Emily Ratajkowski called out a French magazine for retouching an image to make her breasts and lips appear smaller. 

The announcement from Getty follows the brands decision to make stock imagery more diverse earlier this year. Partnering with Campbell Andy, Getty added 42 images titled 'Portrait of young person holding ambiguous gaze' in an attempt to challenge and diversify the white-dominated range of imagery available. 

Getty Images has taken a BIG stance on retouching