So when fashion designer Bella Freud and award-winning perfumer Azzi Glasser join forces to create a trio of fragrances, our ears (or should that be noses?) prick up. Titled Ginsberg is God, 1970 and Je t'aime Jane after Freud's iconic beatnik-inspired designs, each scent is seductively complex - the kind of perfume that lingers alluringly in the air long after its wearer has left the room.

A favourite of Kate Moss ("she's particularly keen on the 1970," Freud says), Alexa Chung ("she loves the candles,") and indie rocker Allison Mosshart (again, 1970), the Bella Freud fragrances and candles have garnered a loyal following among the cool crowd in the UK, where they launched last year. The Bella Freud brand has long been loved by Brit It-girls (Freud herself is a close friend of Mossy's), who have been snapped in her boldly emblazoned designs for street style galleries the world over.

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From fashion to fragrance: Bella Freud on finding her signature scent

But just how do you turn slogans into scent? Enter Azzi Glasser, whose expertise in fusing fashion with fragrance goes back to the original Agent Provocateur perfume and who has created bespoke fragrances for the likes of Jude Law, Orlando Bloom and Johnny Depp. The two women moved in the same circles before coming together to collaborate on first the candle, then fragrance collections. "Rather than having a perfume that's all about top, middle and back notes, it's much more about a concept and bringing a story to life," says Glasser.

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From fashion to fragrance: Bella Freud on finding her signature scent

So just what did 1970 smell like? Effervescent decadence. Together, Freud and Glasser explain each highly desirable scent to Buro below:

Je t'aime Jane: "J'taime Jane is a young English woman with long bare legs, a baby and a guitar," says Freud. "That kind of embodies the revolutionary spirit of a lot of the young women in the late '60s and early '70s who didn't want to conform. Certainly my mother fell into that category. It's about breaking with tradition, in terms of clothing, dressing, conforming, and then also being intriguing and attractive and fascinating. And certainly like Jane Birkin."

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From fashion to fragrance: Bella Freud on finding her signature scent

1970: "This is the hedonist's scent and it's about the sun going down and the atmosphere changing, there's that charge in the air and that feeling of expectation and excitement," says Freud. "I like the idea that there's something you spray on and you've got that kind of tension. There's a suggestion that something thrilling is going to happen."

"It's that real rock n' roll side of Bella's life," says Glasser. "It's the most exotic fragrance of them all and it's one of those smells that lasts through the night. It's hedonistic but it's got that old world raciness about it."

Ginsberg is God: "Ginsburg is the unisex perfume," says Freud. "Think of this kind of poetic figure sitting in his study, holding a pen and writing on paper, no technology stuff. That's the heart of it, the alluring attractiveness of intelligence and intellect."

"I didn't want it to smell old, I wanted to make it quite modern and edgy," says Glasser. "So when you smell it, it has this modern edginess to it, but it also has a heritage.  Lots of women don't want to smell too pretty and want to have a more masculine smell, and they really love this fragrance."


Bella Freud Parfum launches in Australia tomorrow exclusively at Mecca stores and online.

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