We recently wrote about the surprisingly huge range of beauty and wellness benefits of incorporating salt-based products into our external wellness and beauty routines and now there's news that ingesting it might not be the dehydrating, water-retaining, anti-health evil that we thought.

For hundreds of years science has believed that if you eat tons of salt (technical name: sodium chloride) it will throw the body's mineral balance out of whack, making you crave water to flush out the excess salt. So far, so sensible. But a new study published in The Journal of Clinical Investigation says it ain't so. In fact, the study contradicts the old school laws about how our bodies handle salt and goes onto suggest that high salt levels could even result in weight loss. Wait, what?

The new research comes courtesy of Dr Jens Titze a kidney specialist at Vanderbilt University Medical Center and the Interdisciplinary Center for Clinical Research in Germany. According to an article in The New York Times after decades of studying Russian cosmonauts daily diets and resulting body changes/functions Titze noted that instead of the body craving water when eating a lot of salt "...the body most likely had generated or produced water when salt intake was high."

The cosmonauts also complained they were hungrier - not thirstier - when they had higher salt intake implying the increased salt was messing with their metabolism and burning through fat stores. But despite this astounding implication, according to The New York Times, "Dr Titze said he would not advise eating a lot of salt to lose weight."

Reading between the scientific lines it sounds like not even science knows what the effects of an extra shake of flavour enhancer are on the body.

This study says we’ve been SO wrong about our favourite flavour enhancer