Green vegies like kale and spinach have been heralded as the superfoods of the century with every nutritionist, dietitian and #cleaneating A-lister (who we wish to resemble) drilling us to include leafy greens in our daily meal plans.

And usually when something is classed as 'health' food, such as spinach or kale, with multiple magic health benefits we would never consider that chowing down on it could actually be bad for us. Surely the emergency room isn't getting a ton of spinach-related overdose cases?

Probably not and rehab is unlikely to feature in any kale or spinach overdose situation, but we do need to be careful about over consumption of the leafy greens. Find Your Glow super star nutritionist Zoe Dent says, "Consuming excessive amounts of uncooked greens such as spinach/kale can be an issue in regards to oxalates, iron absorption and gastrointestinal difficulties."  Translation? Eating too many uncooked greens can mess with your health.

Specifically, Zoe says, "The oxalates in spinach can combine with calcium in the kidney and cause kidney stones (though you do have to be eating extreme amounts every day for this to be a serious issue). The oxalate in raw spinach can also combine with iron, interfering with the body's ability to absorb it."

Green machine? The surprising truth about too much kale

Plus, you may need to warn your family or work mates to have a gas mask on hand if you're planning to go hard on the green stuff because Zoe says, "Dietary fibre like the fibre found in spinach is essential to healthy digestion, but when eaten in excess, it can cause gastrointestinal distress, including gas, cramps, bloating, constipation or diarrhoea. This is especially pertinent to those who add handfuls of frozen raw vegetables (zucchini and cauliflower) to their smoothies."

On the topic of smoothies, Zoe adds that these stacked drinks can result in other digestive and upsize weight issues, "The amount of sugar some of these so called health smoothies have - 4 apples for example, lead to an insulin sugar spike, don't keep you full and cause you to reach for a snack an hour later. Or if you're having a smoothie with a meal... the smoothie can often contain more fat and sugar than the actual meal resulting in a... "fat trap"."

So it sounds like we need to go back to basics: everything in moderation

For more stellar nutrition advice and healthy recipes head to Zoe's website: www.findyourglow.com.au
Or find her on Insta @findyourglow_nutrition

Green machine? The surprising truth about too much kale