Our thirst for the latest in functional water seems unquenchable, says Buro's resident nutritionist Louise Cavanough

Following the phenomenal rise of coconut water - which has become a billion dollar industry in the last ten years - a new wave of health waters can now be found in the fridges of our health food stores.

Birch and maple water are marketed as magical elixirs with an array of health benefits deserving of superfood status - but it is unlikely they will prove worthy of the hype. Much like coconut water, if you enjoy the taste of these waters, then bottoms up; but if you are drinking them for their purported health benefits alone you may be disappointed.

Being much lower in sugar, they are a decidedly better than soft drinks, fruit juices or sports drinks. They may even have some legitimate health benefits - but they certainly are not a miracle cure for anything other than thirst. Unfortunately, as exciting as it is to see new products in the wellness sector, there is no quick-fix replacement for a nutritious, wholefood diet. Unless you are an elite athlete, severely dehydrated or malnourished, the best way to hydrate is with pure, filtered or spring water.

As with coconut water, it is essential to read the label of any packaged health waters to ensure the brand you are buying does not contain any added sugars or flavours. 

Website: yourbodynutrition.com.au
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