Apparently the number of people turning up at the ER sporting avocado-related injuries has exploded in the past few years leading to the medical profession to call for a safety-warning to be attached to avocados. Who knew the innocuous avo could be so aggressive?

According to an article in The Times, Simon Eccles, secretary of the association and former president of the plastic surgery section of the Royal Society of Medicine, said "People do not anticipate that the avocados they buy can be very ripe and there is minimal understanding of how to handle them. We don't want to put people off the fruit but I think warning labels are an effective way of dealing with this...Perhaps we could have a cartoon picture of an avocado with a knife, and a big red cross going through it?" The article also notes there's a "post-brunch surge" on Saturdays in the ER with victims showing up with severe avo-related cuts that often result in tendon and nerve damage.

Although exact figures for avocado-related injuries aren't known, it's so widespread it has even earned itself a name, "avocado hand " and prompted The New York Times earlier this month to publish an article entitled: "How to cut an avocado without cutting yourself," a must-read for fans of smashed avocado who don't want to lose a finger preparing brunch.

Is our fave brunch food getting a safety warning?