They train profesional athletes, models... and yes, people like you or I. But when you ask a Nike trainer what really, honestly, truly gets results, they only have one thing to say: high intensity. Whether its metcon (aka metabolic conditioning), HIIT or Tabata - the one thing all  training regimes of top athletes and elite models have in common is endurance training and hard, hard work.

Here, four of Nike's top personal trainers share the moves that get serious results:

1. Phoebe di Tommaso, trainer

Move: Burpee to 180° tuck jump

From a squat position, place your hands on the floor directly in front of you and as you shift your weight into them, jump out to a high plank position (chest to floor for advanced). Jump your feet back to the outside of your hands (back into that squat position) and using as much explosive power as you can, drive your knees up towards your chest for a tuck jump. For an even more advanced option add a 180° rotation to your tuck jump.

This drill requires a lot of power and explosiveness, so it's best to nail fewer reps rather than trying to do a long set. 8-10 reps max! Essential for all athletes, especially football and netball where you need to be quick on your feet!

Move: Mountain climbers

Nike trainers share the secret to their killer physique

From a high plank position, drive one knee to chest, keeping weight through the back foot and arms, switching through as efficiently as possible. Switch feet so that the other knee drives to chest as the other foot drives back out. It's super important to keep your shoulders driving forward over wrists and elbows as well as keeping your core tight and making sure your hips are strong/inline with your shoulders. I love these as they're a sure fire way to get your heart rate UP during any stage of a workout, also using full body power. 

2. Steph Bruckner, master trainer

Move: Oblique bunny hop

Nike trainers share the secret to their killer physique

Start in plank position. Jump feet towards the outside of your hand then jump feet back to plank. Repeat on other side making sure you flip your hips facing towards your hand. Works your entire body while increasing upper body and core strength. You also get a big kick in your heart rate!

Move: Broad jump aka Standing long jump

As you sink into a squat, swing your arms back to prepare to jump forward from both feet launching yourself as far forward as you can then land with both feet. Make sure you absorb your landing with knees tracking through midline of foot.

Builds explosive power and strength in your legs. This movement helps to increase your speed, which is essential for any athlete. Excellent for sports where you need to dive for a ball like AFL. You'll also burn lots of calories in the process.

3. Claire Cutler, trainer

Move: Forward lunge rotation

Nike trainers share the secret to their killer physique

Hold your dumbbell by each end just below your chin with your feet hip distance apart. Step forward with one foot into a lunge position with the back knee a couple of inches off the floor and the front knee bent to 90 degrees. Rotate your torso towards your front leg making sure you are twisting through your upper back- pause and return to standing before alternating legs! To progress try straightening your arms and feel your arms and core fire up! Here we target the lower extremity, upper back and core. It's a great one for sports requiring balance, like surfing or gymnastics.

4. Ash Besse, trainer

Move: Kettle bell burpee and deadlift

This is a full body exercise that even the strongest athletes find tough! It activates your quads, hamstrings, gluteals, posterior chain, and chest. It's a high-intensity fat burner and works your power and strength.

Move: Dumbbell squat press  

This is another full body exercise that targets hamstrings, quads, shoulders, abdominals, triceps. Using a low-moderate weight, do high reps at a medium to fast tempo for excellent conditioning. This is a great one to help you ace a tennis serve or shoot a goal.

Nike trainers share the secret to their killer physique