A study published in the National Bureau of Economic Research examined consumer's values and actions when it comes to protecting their own, and their friend's privacy. Susan Athey, a senior the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research and co-author to the study explained: "Generally, people don't seem to be willing to take expensive actions or even very small actions to preserve their privacy." Athey also explained that "even though, if you ask them, they express frustration, unhappiness or dislike of losing their privacy, they tend not to make choices that correspond to those preferences."

Athey, along with co-authors from Massachusetts Institute of Technology examined how 3,108 students played out their privacy preferences. For part of the study, the students were asked to share three of their friends email addresses. Half of the students were offered a cheesy enticement with a deep pan base, to see whether an incentive would influence their decision to share this private information. And here is where the figures come in - a whopping 98% of students (AKA pizza lovers, cheese fiends and horrible friends) chose to take the pizza and hand over their friends emails.

Alarmingly, the control group who were unlucky enough not to be offered the pizza incentive, were also extremely likely to hand over their friends email addresses, with only 6% of students choosing to list fake email addresses. It should be noted however, that there was no written option not to supply the email addresses.

All in all the study results were inconclusive; since the results show that consumers deviate from their stated preferences, there is no way to gauge the market's true privacy preference. The biggest (yet equally least surprising) takeaway is that we love pizza.

Sure friends are great, but do they come with extra pepperoni and parmesan? 

Apparently most of us value pizza over friendship