The swirling patterns of Calacatta and Carrara marble are a fashion, food and beauty blogger's dream - neutral but not too plain, beautiful without looking contrived, they provide the perfect photo backdrop - in a why-yes-I-just-found-this-clutch/cronut/cream-blush-lying-here-with-no-styling-required kind of way.

But this latest trend is here to shake things up a bit - and we couldn't be more ready for a change (when Kmart starts stocking 'marble' homewares, you know it's time to move on). Introducing brilliantly rendered coloured marble, with swirls of contrasting pigments, melded with precious metals and timber for a fascinating effect. Coloured marble and marble-effect homewares are making their mark across Europe - here are the three pieces we need now.

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2. True Colours vases, from $150 each, greatdanefurniture.com

Trending now: coloured marble accessories

Suckers for Danish design will be familiar with &tradition's contemporary aesthetic - the brand epitomises Nordic cool. The seven vases in the True Colours range display chromatic variations and lustrous patinas of oxidised copper, steel, brass and aluminium for a beguiling marble-effect, with contrasting finishes either left raw or highly polished.

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2. Cappellini Vendome dining table, from $5000, cultdesign.com.au

Trending now: coloured marble accessories

Italian design house Cappellini always makes you look twice, and this statement dining table is no exception. Hewn from intricately detailed Breche'de Vendome marble and matched with a striking black metal structure, its slimline design belies the material from which it's made.

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3. Patricia Urquiola Earthquake 5.9 vases, budri.com

Trending now: coloured marble accessories

Crafted in response to the Emilia earthquake that rocked northern Italy in May 2012, these vases layer fragments of marble - shattered during the quake - with onyx and timber. They're the work of prolific Italian designer Patricia Urquiola, who selected earthy neutral stones ranging from plummy purples to warm honeyed tones to create the asymmetric  inlays.

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