Mastering the colour spectrum takes true skill and its use isn't limited to paint: from sculpture to photography to illustration, here are eight artists adept at using colour to seduce their audience.

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Perfect pigment: meet the 8 masters of colour

Anish Kapoor, Ascension (Red), 2010, digital print 

One of the most prominent sculptors of today, Anish Kapoor uses scale, pure pigments and texture to dramatic effect. This image is part of a series of three digital prints that document a vibrant plume of red smoke being shot up through the skylight of the Guggenheim Museum. Many of Kapoor's famous sculptural works explore the mystical and emotional qualities of colour, with strong forms that he covers in intense pure pigment powder.

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Perfect pigment: meet the 8 masters of colour

Josef Albers, Homage to the Square (La Tehuana), 1951, oil on fibreboard 

With a highly disciplined composition and rigorous colour exploration, Josef Albers' most famous paintings and prints make up the remarkable Homage to the Square series. Beginning in 1949 and amounting to hundreds of arrangements in chromatic interactions, Albers used a nested set of three or four squares of solid colour planes. Recording the colours on the back of each work, he used a palette knife and dense oils, working on the rough side of wood fibreboard, to construct his mechanical but highly poetic colour studies.

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Perfect pigment: meet the 8 masters of colour

Tauba Auerbach, Untitled (Fold), 2011, acrylic on canvas 

Tauba Auerbach is considered to be of the most innovative painters of our time, drawing from logical systems in mathematics and physics and breaking them down to create a new form of visual poetry. Her works are strong in colour and abstract patterns that collapse dimensions and create illusion.

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Perfect pigment: meet the 8 masters of colour

Yves Klein, Blue Monochrome, 1961, IKB pigment on canvas 

Controversial French artist Yves Klein is best known for patenting his favourite colour - International Klein Blue, a dense, rich shade of ultramarine. Through the power of colour and abstraction, and with a fascination for the infinite, Klein insisted his paintings were "the void" and he expected the beholder to invest their own feelings into his art.

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Perfect pigment: meet the 8 masters of colour

Frank Stella, Isfahan, 1969, acrylic on canvas

A very well regarded artist, American painter and printmaker Frank Stella's most famous works emphasise the picture as object. From the 1960s he began to introduce a wide range of colours in a style of arranged straight or curved block coloured lines, separated by a pinstripe of unpainted line, and often using unusually shaped canvases to form mesmerising abstract layouts.

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Perfect pigment: meet the 8 masters of colour

Andy Warhol, Debbie Harry, 1980, acrylic and silkscreen ink on canvas 

A leading figure in the pop art movement, Andy Warhol has enjoyed much more than his famed expression '15 minutes of fame,' with his works among the most expensive ever sold. His sought-after celebrity portrait screen-prints were produced in multiple coloured versions in the style of the period, taking their cues from advertising and pop culture.

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Perfect pigment: meet the 8 masters of colour

Greg Bogin, Kiss, 2014, synthetic paint and urethane on canvas 

Using vivid and contracting hues with gradients, NY artist Greg Bogin's paintings draw on a deep analysis of art history and contemporary society. Everything appears bright and perfect in his works, which, just as in real life, work to conceal reality. Keeping to a limited range of geometric elements, Bogin uses rigorous precision to create compositions that reference both the early '60s and the advertising logos of the '70s.

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Perfect pigment: meet the 8 masters of colour

Guy Bourdin, Vogue Paris, May, 1970, photograph 

French photographer Guy Bourdin was best known for his provocative fashion and advertising images for luxury brands, setting the scene for a new kind of unconventional fashion photography. Creating complex and often provocative narratives using rich, sensual and contrasting colour combinations, Boudin's images have a distinct style that both shocked and allured the beholder, creating a surreal but highly desirable fantasy world.

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