Since princess-to-be Meghan Markle's debuted a 'messy bun' during a recent royal outing it's the style we all want to copy, writes Cleo Glyde

It is a truth universally acknowledged that a working princess greets her posy-carrying public with glossy, cascading locks on official engagements.

Ever since Duchess of Cambridge Kate, said "I do" she has inspired a return to tradition for a new generation with her classic alpha blowouts, elaborate up-dos and elegantly tilted hats; royalty's contemporary star, Kate still parties like it's 1959.

Then Meghan Markle burst onto the scene with Prince Harry's heart in the pocket of her Stella McCartney tie-waist coat. Breaking all the unspoken rules out of the gate (divorced, American and an actress for starters), Markle's first beauty look on official duty at Cardiff Castle was that most casual of 'dos: the messy bun - a style that screams 'just like the rest of us'.

Seeing a future member of the British Royal Family officially debut with hair that isn't really 'on' was ground-breaking. When royal-to-be Markle visited a youth radio station in Brixton with the same loosey-goosey tousled bun with flyaway tendrils drifting across her face - well, the messy bun was officially her thing.

Some clutched their pearls, @WriteRoyalty critiqued, "Please tidy the hair - it's a tad too messy,"  but on the whole, the Internet lit up with delight, regarding Markle's beauty approach as 'relatable' and 'unstuff'.

"As an actress and social media influencer, Meghan Markle knows that styling makes an important statement," asserts Sydney-based hairstylist George Giavis, who sees her messy bun as a declaration of intent on Markle's royal role. "It says that this future princess is going to be laid-back, sexier and cooler than the perfectly coiffed princess of the past. The messiness is relatable to the public - the perfect match for how she and Prince Harry have approached their public outings to date."

The clientele in Giavis' well-heeled Woollahra salon are also adopting a more laissez-faire attitude as natural hair texture and softer silhouettes suddenly seem more fresh and modern for after-five than tight chignons and formal waves.

But don't let the casual demeanour of Meghan's bun fool you. Just like 'done undone' makeup (that dance of subtly applied neutrals and illumination) is more artful than simply wearing no makeup, the messy bun needs polish to stand apart from morning shower 'bedhair', especially if you're off to meet your own version of the mother-in-law.

"It's chic and on trend," enthuses Giavis. "It may not get an airing at a formal state dinner or with a tiara, but I'd love to see her try."

Messy buns best suit shoulder length hair of at least moderate thickness. "If your hair is too fine or you don't have enough volume, you won't get the desired messiness." Giavis says.

Scroll through for Giavis' step-by-step guide to getting your royal messy bun on:

Try a royal hair update with Meghan Markle’s messy bun