J-law's shoulder-skimming, volume-heavy style at the Madid premiere of The Hunger Games: the Mockingjay Part 2 had us all doing double-takes - is it a lob? A bob? None of the above, says award-winning Sydney hairdresser (and Buro go-to) Barney Martin - that would be a schlob.

It's not the prettiest sounding word but the result is downright sex on legs - and you only have to look at the latest crop of models and celebs all sporting the cut to see why. The schlob roughly translates to shaggy lob: think a jaw length bob, with plenty of movement, natural texture and - yep, it's back - a choppy fringe. "This style is the perfect way to experiment with a shorter haircut," says Martin. "As long as the hair texture isn't super curly it will work."

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Move over, balayage: this is THE new haircut for summer

Stella McCartney S/S '16

 

The look is best suited to oval face shapes but can also work with round or square jaws if the ends are left a little longer. As for the fringe: "the shorter, choppier and more textured the better," says Martin. Why we love it: the look is fresh, relaxed and beachy - and there's something seriously sexy about a rough-cropped mane.

"I like styling a lob with texturising spray to achieve an effortless and undone look," Martin says. "To achieve a workable texture, spritz sea salt or texturising spray through damp hair and set your hairdryer to a low speed. Roughly blow dry hair, scrunching the mid-lengths and ends with your hands to create that effortless finish."

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Move over, balayage: this is THE new haircut for summer

Stella McCartney S/S '16

 

As for colour, it's bye bye balayage: hello, sombré. We're all getting a bit fatigued by obvious dip-dyed ends, and sombre is its natural successor. "Sombré is soft, subtle ombre," Martin explains. It's not limited to your ends either: "It's the weaving of micro-fine, spaced out, highlighted pieces of hair through the root to soften and blend the natural base colour into the lightened ends," he says. "That way we still get to keep our gorgeous light tips and flicks, with micro-highlights around the face to brighten the complexion." Sounds damn perfect to us.

The sombré technique really comes into its own with blondes - think Rosie Huntington-Whitely tones. "Pearl gold, wheat and barley tones are perfect for light coloured hair," says Martin. "For medium blondes try cognac, sunny blonde and biscuit blonde. Salted caramel, dark sand and natural chestnut are perfect for dark hair with the overall message being refined texture."

Move over, balayage: this is THE new haircut for summer

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