A glistening oil slick across your face is on no one's skin wish list but it's an unfortunate reality for many of us especially in summer when sweat and oil production are up. Blotting papers are one quick fix but if you don't have one handy, it's oil city.

So we're happy to report that there may be better solution to this oily issue, according to Fashionista a side effect noticed by Botox users is that not only does it halt wrinkles but it also makes the skin less oily.

Dr Joshua Zeichner, director at New York's Mount Sinai Hospital dermatology department told Fashionista, "While it (Botox) is not FDA-approved to treat oiliness, we find that this commonly  happens as a side effect when we treat our patients' wrinkles."

Botox is FDA-approved in the US for cosmetics use, treatment of excessive sweating, plus a number of other medical uses and has similar approvals in Australia. And the reason Botox works to reduce excessive sweating is believed to be the same reason it has been found to help treat oil production.

Botox works to paralyse muscles and in the case of sweating it paralyses the sweat glands to stop them producing sweat, apparently it works the same way on oil glands. Botox also doesn't just work at the point of the needle entry, according to the article it diffuses out to the surrounding area giving a one-two punch to any wrinkles, sweat glands and oil glands in the vicinity.

In the article, Dr Zeichner explains, "This diffusion explains how it gives parallel effectiveness in treating both oil and sweat glands as well as muscles under the skin."

And while we love a multi-tasking skincare fix, we're not advocating heading out to your local chemist and loading up on DIY Botox - medical injectables should only be administered by a qualified medical professional.

Oily skin? This news is a game-changer